FAQ

Below is a list of questions that we receive often. Please feel free to reach out if you have further questions about Thriving Families Alliance, our programs, or ways that we serve our community.

  • What is the Thriving Families Alliance?

The Thriving Families Alliance is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) agency that brings people and communities together to advance child safety, family stability, and positive environments. We partner with local nonprofits, government, schools, and social service agencies to address our community's most pressing needs.  We believe that, with coordination and collaboration, services and initiatives are much more effective.

 

The Thriving Families Alliance was formed to serve as an umbrella organization to build bridges among these groups who share a common goal- supporting children to achieve their highest potential.  We work to empower a caring community that promises the well-being of every child.  

 

The name of our agency reflects our continued belief that the best problem solving for children and families occurs at the local level with a collaborative, partnering efforts from all parts of the community: non-profit, government agencies, civic and faith based organizations, businesses, families and individuals.  Together, we can ensure that all children and families are thriving.

  • Who runs the Thriving Families Alliance?

Our knowledgeable, well-trained staff works with a number of partner agencies, as well as the Pottawattamie County Governance Board, Harrison – Monona – Shelby Decategorization Board, Harrison – Monona – Shelby Early Childhood Board, and Fremont – Page – Taylor Decategorization Board.

 

The governance boards set policy and strategic direction, as well as financial practices and operational procedures. These boards are comprised of local community members, that include needed representation and knowledge of health, education, human services, faith, business, and use of services.Also represented are elected officials, Department of Human Services and Juvenile Court Services.

  • Who decides which programs to invest in?

Review committees of governance board members and experts from our community carefully screen and select the programs supported. Their recommendations are reviewed and approved by the appropriate governance board. After selection, these programs are rigorously monitored to ensure they produce positive, measurable results.

  • What’s the difference between Thriving Families Alliance and other nonprofits?

Thriving Families Alliance is infrastructure, umbrella organization used to oversee state and local initiatives in Western Iowa. We mobilize others and convene partner agencies, community leaders and policymakers to make broad, systemic changes like no other organization can on its own.

  • Does the Thriving Families Alliance provide direct support and services to children and families?

The large majority of our work is with various agencies to improve access to support services for children and families.

  • Where does most of Thriving Families Alliance’s funding come from?

Approximately $2 million of funding is generated through the Child Welfare Decategorization Program, Early Childhood Iowa, Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning, and Community Partnerships for Protecting Children.Additional funds are generated through Prevent Child Abuse Iowa, the Iowa Department of Public Health, and other grant opportunities as needed.

  • What is Decategorization?

Decategorization (also known at Decat) is designed to redirect child welfare and juvenile justice funding to services which are more preventative, family-centered and community-based in order to reduce use of restrictive approaches that rely on institutional, out-of-home and out-of-community care. Iowa Code Section 232, which was initially enacted in 1993, states that the Governance Board must include representatives of the Department of Human Services and Juvenile Court Services respectively, and officials with the authority to represent county governments. Decategorization is designed to redirect child welfare and juvenile justice funding to services which are more preventative, family-centered and community-based in order to reduce use of restrictive approaches that rely on institutional, out-of-home and out-of-community care.

  • What is Early Childhood Iowa?

Early Childhood Iowa (ECI) was formerly known as Empowerment Iowa.This was established by the state legislature in 1999. The legislature appropriated funds to support state and community partnerships and collaboration among education, health, and human services for children ages 0- 5. The vision of Early Childhood Iowa- Pottawattamie County is that "Every child, beginning at birth, will be healthy and successful."

  • What is the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV)?

MIECHV is a collaboration and partnership at the federal, state, and community levels to improve the health of at-risk children through evidence-based home visiting programs. The home visiting programs reach pregnant women, expectant fathers, and parents and caregivers of children under the age of 5. MIECHV is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in collaboration with the Administration for Children & Families (ACF).